The City of Perth has a vision to collect, digitise and fully integrate various art and culture records and make them publicly available for viewing online. These records currently include: 

  • Art Galleries
  • City of Perth Public Art collection
  • City of Perth Commemorative Plaques
  • origins of street names

Art Galleries
Shows the location of art galleries across the City with a direct link to their websites

Public Art Collection
The City of Perth regularly commissions Public Art in civic squares, streetscapes, parks and some unexpected places and has over 100 works of art distributed throughout the city's precincts (West Perth, East Perth, Northbridge and the CBD). These commissioned works stimulate our thinking, deepen our sense of place and experience of space, and transform the places where we live, work, and play.  You can view information and photographs of the City’s Public Art online.

The City of Perth regularly commissions Public Art in civic squares, streetscapes, parks and some unexpected places, recognizing that the successful integration of site-specific art enhances the enjoyment of the city experience.

By investing in the City's Public Art Collection, as well as commissioning temporary, ephemeral works, the City is a leader in the development of a rich cultural landscape, helping to create vibrant and active public spaces - essential for a safe and stimulating environment.

The City of Perth Public Art Collection has over 100 works of art distributed throughout the city's precincts (West Perth, East Perth, Northbridge and the CBD). The City continues to commission public works of art and facilitate significant private art projects within the boundaries of Western Australia's capital city, showing leadership and vision in its choices.

Our significant collection of major historic and contemporary public art works includes permanent and temporary installations; works in outdoor private and public spaces, on or within the fabric of buildings or in public foyers; traditional media (e.g. stone, bronze, wood, steel, ceramic), new media (e.g. light based, electronic and digital works), and environmental works (e.g. earthworks, landscape art); and functional works (e.g.. benches and fountains).

These commissioned works stimulate our thinking, deepen our sense of place and experience of space, and transform the places where we live, work, and play.

St Georges Terrace Commemorative Plaques
Walk along St Georges Terrace and you are stepping back through history.  In fact, it could be that you are walking in the very footsteps of those people whose names are honoured on the street plaques below. These are people who have left their mark, in some significant way, on Western Australia. They include politicians, doctors, pioneers, teachers, sports people and civic leaders. It is also interesting to contemplate how life must have been back in the days when some of these people were such prominent citizens of Western Australia.  So next time you step out on St Georges Terrace you will have a source of information on all those people who have been honoured. The plaques commence on the southern side of St Georges Terrace outside The Perth Concert Hall and progress chronologically in a westerly direction and then back again on the northern side finishing at Irwin Street. The City of Perth is proud to commemorate the contributions made by these distinguished West Australians. You can view information and photographs of the City’s Commemorative Plaques online.

Source:
"City of Perth St George’s Terrace Commemorative Plaques 1829-1989' (June 2003) & 'City of Perth St. George’s Terrace Commemorative Plaques for 1990-1999' (June 2009)"

Origins of Streets

The first accurate plan of Perth with street names was prepared by Alfred Hillman under the direction of the Surveyor-General and issued in 1838.  The plan was revised in the years 1841 and 1845.  The first plan of Perth showed some rather peculiar phases.  For instance, it demonstrated that it was never intended that the centre of the City should be around Barrack and Hay Streets.  The centre of the city as originally laid out was at the intersections of Goderich and Lord Streets, the site of the Roman Catholic Cathedral.  The main portions of the city were at the intersections of St George's Terrace and William Streets as well as James and Stirling Streets.  This was evident as these streets were all surveyed as the widest streets in the city.  Many of the names of the streets have been changed since the original plan was drawn.  The plan was first changed in 1897 when the City of Perth decided to re-arrange street names and get rid of the anomaly of having two names for different portions of the same street. You can view the origins of streets online.

The first accurate plan of Perth with street names was prepared by Alfred Hillman under the direction of the Surveyor-General and issued in 1838.  The plan was revised in the years 1841 and 1845.  

The first plan of Perth showed some rather peculiar phases.  For instance, it demonstrated that it was never intended that the centre of the City should be around Barrack and Hay Streets.  The centre of the city as originally laid out was at the intersections of Goderich and Lord Streets, the site of the Roman Catholic Cathedral.  The main portions of the city were at the intersections of St George's Terrace and William Streets as well as James and Stirling Streets.  This was evident as these streets were all surveyed as the widest streets in the city.  

Many of the names of the streets have been changed since the original plan was drawn.  The plan was first changed in 1897 when the City of Perth decided to re-arrange street names and get rid of the anomaly of having two names for different portions of the same street.  (note early map of street names).

Dates given are from the original plans in the Department of Land Administration which the street names were first shown.