Visitors and residents often describe the City of Perth as a parkland oasis.

There aren't many cities in the world which mix commerce and retail with beautifully crafted green open space combining heritage, public art and water features. This attribute is considered a major asset and plays a central role in city planning strategies.

Within the city boundaries there are 16 major parkland areas and many smaller parks, road reserves and car parks covering a total of 140 hectares in area. The Swan River foreshore parklands form a 10 kilometre natural boundary for the City.

Some parks and gardens are able to be booked for wedding ceremonies and photography. See Booking Council Reserves and Streets for more information.

Park/Garden name Heritage
listed
Public
toilets
Stirling Gardens  
Supreme Court Gardens
Langley Park
Queens Gardens
Harold Boas Gardens
Council House Gardens    
Ozone Reserve  
Point Fraser  
Heirisson Island  
Wellington Square  
Claisebrook    
Victoria Gardens  
Mardalup Park    
Russell Square (toilets located nearby at Roe Street car park)  
Totterdell Park    
John Oldham Park (Narrows Interchange)  
JH Abrahams Reserve  

Stirling Gardens

Location: Corner of Barrack Street and St George’s Terrace.

Stirling Gardens are Perth’s oldest public gardens. The gardens, named after Governor James Stirling, were originally used as an acclimatisation garden where many of its mature specimens were raised from seed. Grapes and other important fruits were first grown here. In 1845 it was opened as a botanical garden and some original trees planted still stand within the Gardens today.

Reconstruction of Stirling Gardens was carried out in 1965 with the Toodyay stone retaining wall and shallow pools which were designed by the City of Perth. Stirling Gardens honours the name of Sir James Stirling who fought long and hard for the establishment of a settlement in Western Australia. A more recent feature of the Gardens is the kangaroo sculptures and water feature. Located within Stirling Gardens are the “Ore Obelisk”, Supreme Court Building and Perth’s oldest building “The Old Court House Law Museum”

Facilities:
•    Seating   
•    Drinking fountains

Artwork: 
•    Kangaroo statues
•    Gumnut Babies
•    Harmony of Minerals
•    Pen Nibs

Stirling Garden Kangaroos

 Supreme Court Gardens

Location: Supreme Court Gardens is located on the corner of Riverside Drive between Governors Avenue and Barrack Street.

Supreme Court Gardens are part of an important open space area in the Central Business District. The garden is semi enclosed by mature trees and gardens. Many Events are held in the Gardens throughout the year including ANZAC Day service, Opera in the Park and Carols by Candlelight.

The gardens were formed following the reclamation of the Swan River shallows in 1903 and planted as gardens in 1920.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    Drinking fountains 
•    Public Toilets

Supreme Court Gardens

Langley Park

Location: Langley Park is bounded by Riverside Drive, Victoria Avenue, Terrace Road and Plain Street.

Langley Park was created by land reclamation between 1921 and 1935, in response to the need for public open space near the city. Major (later Sir) Norman Brearley used this park as an airstrip when he pioneered civil aviation in Western Australia in the 1920's, a time when aviation was routinely perilous.

The airstrip was re-named Langley Park after the Acting Lord Mayor, TW Langley, who on 3 August 1937 opened the first section of Riverside Drive.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    Drinking fountains 
•    Children’s Playground
•    Adult Exercise station
•    Toilets 
•    Street Parking
•    Recommended Exercise Area

Langley Park Playground

Queens Gardens

Location: Queens Gardens is bounded by Hay Street, Hale Street, Nelson Crescent and Plain Street.

The site of Queen's Gardens has been closely associated with the physical and social development of the City of Perth, initially as part of the commonage which was used for recreation purposes including horse racing and later as a clay mine and brickworks. The bricks produced between 1860 and 1890, went into several of Perth's most prominent buildings. These buildings include the Perth Town Hall, Pensioners Barracks of which the arch remains (Barracks Arch) and the Cloisters building.

The gardens were officially opened in 1899 and named Queens Gardens after Queen Victoria in honour of her Diamond Jubilee.

The main features of the gardens include water lily-filled lakes (the old clay pits), massed displays of flowers, manicured lawns and a large variety of trees and shrubs, a park bench made famous in the movie “Notting Hill” and a replica of the Peter Pan statue that is located in Kensington Gardens, London.

Queens Gardens is a popular wedding venue, an open rotunda is the favoured location.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    Rotunda
•    Drinking fountains
•    Toilets
•    Street Parking
•    Recommended Wedding Venue

Attractions:
•    Peter Pan statue

Queens Garden

Harold Boas Gardens

Location: Corner of Wellington and Colin Streets, West Perth.

Named after architect and former City of Perth Councillor, Harold Boas, the gardens feature a lake, waterfall and rock cascade. Dense shrubberies with large grassed areas and ample shade from the trees, provides a restful respite for city workers. Originally known as Delhi Square the park was redeveloped in 1976. Many of the original trees planted in 1900 were retained in the redevelopment.

Facilities:
•    Children’s playground                                         
•    Public Toilets
•    Street Parking
•    Seating 
•    Recommended Wedding Venue

Harold Boas Gardens is a popular location for wedding parties with  four  areas set aside for wedding ceremonies.

 

Council House Gardens

Location: Council House, 27 St Georges Terrace.

The current Council House Gardens were developed following the refurbishment of Council House in 1999. The majority of the gardens are planted on the roof of the underground car park and many of the  trees that date back to the 1860’s were retained during the redevelopment.

The gardens form a formal frontage to Council House and an area to the rear of Council House that highlights the Heritage listed building

 

Ozone Reserve

Location: Ozone Reserve is bounded by Adelaide Terrace, Riverside Drive and Plain Street.

The Ozone Reserve was redeveloped in 2003 with the inclusion of a lake known as Lake Vasto and the planting of trees and dense shrubberies of native plants.  The primary purpose of the lake is to store treated bore water to irrigate approximately 54 hectares of Foreshore and Parklands from Queens Gardens to the north of Council House.

A feature of the reserve is the ‘Monument to Migrants’ - The eight metre high stone and bronze statue is a gift to the city from the Abruzzese Emigrant Association

Facilities:  
•    Seating
•    Drinking Fountain
•    Gazebo
•    Children’s Playground
•    BBQ

Note: The closest public toilet is at Point Fraser.

Attractions:

•    Lake Vasto
•    Monument to Migrants

 

Point Fraser

Location: Point Fraser is located on the river side of Riverside Drive neary the Causeway roundabout, and opposite Ozone Reserve.

Point Fraser was named after botanist Sir Charles Fraser. The area was developed in 2003 as an innovative urban wetland to intercept drainage water and strip it of nutrients before it enters  the Swan River.

Point Fraser features a series of pathways and boardwalks with interpretive signage  detailing the environmental, historical and cultural trails.

Facilities
•    Canoe and bicycle hire
•    Seating
•    Playground
•    Barbecues
•    Drinking fountains
•    Toilets
•    Parking

 

Heirisson Island

Location: Between the two Causeway bridges and  is accessible by foot and cycle path from Point Fraser to the north and McCallum Park to the south.

Named after a midshipman on the French ship Le Naturaliste which was a scientific expedition led by Nicolas Baudin between 1801 and 1804, Heirisson Island is located in an area once consisting of a series of mud flats known by the traditional owners, the Beeloo Nyungah people, as Matagarup. Where the island currently stands was a much smaller island known as Kakaroomup.

From 1831 into the 1960’s the mudflats were transformed by dredging of the river and dumping of sand, soil and building rubble with the  island taking its current form in the 1930’s.

In 1975 the island was vested in the City of Perth as an “A” Class Reserve and major landscaping works were undertaken consisting of earthworks and tree and shrub planting.

A colony of western grey kangaroos can be found on the southern side of the island.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    Barbecues and Picnic shelters
•    Children’s Playground  
•    Kangaroos
•    Toilets
•    Parking (access from south bound lanes of the Causeway)

Artwork
•    Yagan

 

Wellington Square

Location: On Wellington Street East Perth and bounded  by Bennett, Wittenoom, and Hill Streets.

This park was originally a swampland and was drained in the 1830’s to establish  a public reserve , providing an ideal open space to train and exercise horses stabled in the area.

Wellington Square was formally named in honour of the Duke of Wellington, the British Prime Minister when the Swan River Colony was founded. Among locals the reserve  became popularly known as 'The Rec.'

In 1898 two cricket pitches were installed and the ground was cleared to make a cricket field. 
The park is still very much a recreation ground today and still used as a cricket ground.

Facilities
•    Seating
•    Synthetic cricket pitch x 2
•    Exercise station
•    Toilets
•    Street Parking

 

Claisebrook

Location: At the eastern end of Royal Street East Perth on the southern side of Claisebrook Cove.

Developed in the 1990’s as part of the Claisebrook Cove Village development it features shaded lawns and walkways with a central channel featuring artwork representing East Perths natural wetland state and the power of water to sculpt the landscape. The channel leads into and out of a lake which has a primary purpose of providing water for irrigating approximately 10 hectares of East Perth parklands while still providing an ornamental feature for the reserve. The channel ends at the Claisebrook Cove. Water for the lakes is sourced from the Claisebrook storm water drain.

Underpasses provide safe access along the walkway to the Claisebrook Cove and along the way you will find numerous cafes and restaurants that overlook the lake and cove.

Facilities
•    Seating
•    Cafes/Restaurants       
•    Barbecues
•    Street Parking

Artwork
•    The greenway
•    The impossible triangle
•    Sculptured seats

Claisebrook lake Reserve

 

Victoria Gardens

Location: Victoria Gardens is located at the eastern end of Royal Street East Perth on the southern side of Claisebrook Cove.

Victoria Gardens is one of Perth’s early parks. Originally planted in the late 1800’s for many years it lay unrecognised surrounded by light industry and residences. The area was upgraded in the 1990’s as the centrepiece of the Claisebrook Cove Village development. A number of original trees still exist on site. Victoria Gardens features many artworks recognising the indigenous history and culture of the area – a theme that carries through the East Perth parklands.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    Barbecue
•    Gazebo/Shelter                                           
•    Drinking fountain
•    Artworks
•    Toilets
•    Recomended wedding venue
•    Parking

Artwork: 

•    The Charnick Woman
•    Ngango Batta’s Mooditcher
•    Regneration
 

Victoria Gardens

 

Mardalup Park

Location: At the eastern end of Brown Street East Perth on the northern side of the entry to Claisebrook Cove and  can be accessed via pedestrian bridge from Victoria Gardens.

Located at the eastern end of Brown Street East Perth, Mardalup Park was created in 1997 and built on the site of the former East Perth gas works. In the past the area was used by many Nyungar families as a camping ground. Mardalup is a Nyungar term; its English translation is 'place of small marsupial'.

The park features many artworks constructed from materials from the old gasworks. Located at the river’s edge this is an ideal location for picnickers or somewhere to just sit back, relax and enjoy.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    BBQ Facilities
•    Drinking water                               
•    Children’s playground
•    Artworks
•    Parking

Artwork:
•    Channel markers, posts and seats

 

Russell Square

Location: James Street Northbridge, bounded by Parker, Shenton, and Aberdeen Streets.

This parkland was officially named 'Russell Square', in memory of Lord John Russell, the Secretary of State and Colonies, 1839, and Prime Minister, 1846-1852. However, from an early stage it became known as 'Parco dei Sospire', - 'The Park of Sighs'. It gained this title as it was the favoured meeting place of the Italian community of 'Little Italy'. It was also opposite the Italians' favoured pub, the Victoria Hotel.

Originally, the design of the park was modelled on the square fenced gardens built in London in the mid-19th century.

In October 1994 Russell Square was upgraded with improvements such as the installtion of gateways, fencing,lighting, park furniture, water features, reconstructing the paving and irrigation system were included. Also, as part of the program, the park has become home for some thirty original sculptures, designed and constructed by local artists Greg James and Drago Dadich. They add life to the square and are well worth a look.

Facilities:
•    Seating
•    Rotunda
•    Drinking fountains
•    Children’s playground
•    Street parking

Artwork
•    Pagoda, Original sculptures designed and constructed by local artists Greg James and Drago Dadich.

 

Totterdell Park

Location: Arthur Street, West Perth and bounded by Thomas and Colin Streets.

Named after Sir Joseph Totterdell, Lord Mayor of Perth 1946 – 1953, Totterdell Park is a small park surrounded by screening shrubberies to provide a tranquil oasis for nearby residents and office workers to relax in.

Facilities
•    Seating
•    Playground                                         
•    Drinking fountain
•    Street parking

 

John Oldham Park (Narrows Interchange)

Location: Mounts Bay Road, Perth with the  area is easily accessed from foreshore cycle paths.

John Oldham park is located within the Narrows Interchange Parklands which were developed in 1959 with the reclamation of 24 hectares of land from Mounts Bay for the construction of the Narrows Bridge approach and interchange. This land reclamation, which started in October 1954, saw the addition of 3,400,000 m3 of sand.

The parklands are divided into two regions:

  • John Oldham Park – named after John Oldham a respected Western Australian Landscape architect. This area features a lake and waterfall set in lush surrounds. Walk and cycle paths make the area easily accessible.
  • David Carr Memorial Park - Named to honour the late Mr David Carr, a former Commissioner of Town Planning. This area features lakes, walk and cycle paths and underpasses to provide safe access through the area and linking John Oldham Park to the Swan River foreshore.

Facilities
•    Seating
•    Barbecues (John Oldham)
•    Playground (John Oldham)
•    Drinking fountains                                                       
•    Exercise station (David Carr foreshore)                               
•    Toilets (David Carr)
•    Parking (John Oldham)

 

JH Abrahams Reserve

Location: Hackett Drive, Crawley, WA 6009 Australia

Facilities
•    Playground
•    BBQ
•    Drinking Fountain
•    Public Toilets
•    Seating
•    Parking

Artwork
•    Qantas Catalina Memorial
•    Interpretative Signage

JH Abrahams Reserve is located in the suburb of Crawley. It is an important space on the Swan River foreshore as a focal point for both local and regional recreation activities.

The Reserve abuts Matilda Bay Reserve to the North, managed by the Department of Environment and Conservation; and open reserve land to the South, managed by the City of Nedlands.

JH Abrahams Reserve has a long history of use by both indigenous and non-indigenous people.

JH Abrahams Bush Forever Site forms part of the Pelican Point Bush Forever site 402 and is of important conservation value.

JH Abrahams Reserve